Will Quince: what did he say about Boris Johnson?

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Will Quince has rejoined Boris Johnson’s reshuffled cabinet as Education Secretary alongside James Cleverly

His resignation lasted just 24 hours before he agreed to return to his old job following the Prime Minister’s resignation on July 7.

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Quince handed in his resignation after saying he had “no choice” but to resign after being given “wrong” information.

On Monday (July 4) the minister gave an interview in which he assured the public that he had been “categorically assured” that Johnson was not aware of any “specific” allegations against Pincher.

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However, this turned out to be inaccurate as the Prime Minister was aware of allegations dating back to 2019.

Here’s everything you need to know about who Will Quince is and why he’s rejoined the Cabinet.

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Who is Will Quince?

Will Quince speaks at a roundtable hosted by Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge to mark the release of new research from the Royal Foundation Center for Early Childhood (Image: POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

Will Quince is a Conservative MP for Colchester and has served the constituency since May 2015.

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He was appointed Minister for Children in September 2021, having previously worked at the Department for Works and Pensions.

Why did Will Quince resign?

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Quince announced his retirement Twitterwhere he stated he had to offer his resignation after being given inaccurate information about the prime minister.

He tweeted: “It is with great sadness and regret that I submitted my resignation to the Prime Minister this morning after accepting and repeating assurances to the media on Monday that have now been shown to be inaccurate.”

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On Monday (July 4), Quince conducted interviews to defend Johnson in the Pincher scandal.

He assured the public that he had been “categorically assured” that Johnson was not aware of any “specific” allegations against the former Chief Whip.

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However, that information turned out to be false, and the Prime Minister admitted on July 5 that he had received a briefing following an investigation into Pincher’s conduct.

What did Will Quince say in his resignation letter?

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In Quince’s resignation letter, he addressed the inaccurate information he received and shared in support of Johnson.

He stated that he felt he had “no choice” and that he had “taken and reiterated these representations in good faith.”

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Here is Quince’s full resignation letter:

“Dear Prime Minister. Thank you for meeting me last night and for your sincere apologies regarding the briefings I received from No 10 ahead of Monday’s media round which we now know are inaccurate.

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“It is with great sadness and regret that I feel that I have no choice but to tender my resignation as Minister for Children and Families, having accepted and reiterated these assurances in good faith.

“It has been my honor to serve in government since 2019, both in the Department of Works and Pensions and in the Department of Education.

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“Making this decision was not easy. It pains me greatly to leave a job I love where we work every day to improve the life chances of vulnerable and disadvantaged children and youth in our country.

“I will miss it dearly but promise to do everything I can to continue this important work from the back benches.

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“I would like to take this opportunity to express my sincere gratitude to the hundreds of dedicated and hard-working officers who have been a pleasure to work with.”

What’s his new role?

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It’s almost like he was never gone because 24 hours later Quince is back as Minister for Children.

He has yet to comment on reprising the role.

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Johnson has reshuffled his cabinet to fill some of the vacancies created as a result of the mass resignations.

Other newly appointed ministers include James Cleverly as education secretary, the third to be appointed in just a week.

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The PM, who is playing a caretaker role while a new successor is secured, has been criticized by Conservatives who are calling for his resignation.

Former Prime Minister John Major has suggested that Dominic Raab would be better off taking over as acting Prime Minister.

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On July 7, Downing Street released a statement in which they “made it clear that the Government would not seek to implement new policies or make any major changes in direction”.

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