Why has Boris Johnson resigned as Prime Minister?

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He will announce in the coming hours that he is stepping down as leader of the Conservative Party and Prime Minister.

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The announcement that Mr Johnson will be stepping down comes after a record number of ministers have resigned from his government since Tuesday (5 July).

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A No.10 source said Mr Johnson spoke to Sir Graham Brady, leader of the 1922 Conservative Committee, this morning to update him on his decision to resign.

“The Prime Minister has spoken to Graham Brady and has agreed to step down in time for a new leader to be installed by the October conference,” they said.

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Scotland’s Liberal Democrats have said Conservative “fighting and sheer incompetence” has cost taxpayers more money during this cost of living crisis (Photo: Daniel Leal/PA).

Why did Boris Johnson resign as Prime Minister?

Mr Johnson is set to step down as Prime Minister after support for his position as Prime Minister collapsed within his party.

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It started with Mr Sunak and Mr Javid, but his new Education Secretary, Michelle Donalan, who has only been in the role since Tuesday, and Brandon Lewis, the Northern Ireland Secretary, have resigned.

The prime minister had tried to defy his critics and remain in office, despite warnings from cabinet colleagues that it was unsustainable.

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But the resignations today (July 7) continued and Chancellor Nadhim Zahawi – who was only appointed to the role on Tuesday – went public with his call for the prime minister to resign.

Defense Secretary Ben Wallace, who did not resign, also called on the Prime Minister to resign.

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The resignation came when it became unclear whether the ministerial posts could be filled – with departments such as the flagship “Leveling Up” and “Education” remaining completely vacant.

The loss of support in his own party comes after a series of scandals plagued Mr Johnson’s leadership.

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What scandals has Boris Johnson’s government faced lately?

This week’s tsunami of resignations came after the Prime Minister was heavily criticized for his handling of the Chris Pincher scandal.

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The deputy chief whip resigned on Friday July 1 after alleging he had groped two men at a private members’ club.

Mr Johnson originally resisted removing Mr Pincher’s whip before changing his mind.

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He also denied being aware of previous allegations against Mr Pincher and later claimed he simply “forgot” about them.

His handling of this latest scandal served as a catalyst for the mass resignations.

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He had previously been criticized for his handling of the Owen Paterson affair, who was accused of breaking MP lobbying rules.

Mr Paterson eventually resigned, sparking a North Shropshire by-election which was won by the Liberal Democrats.

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Mr Johnson was then rocked by the Partygate allegations in late 2021 and early 2022, which revealed a series of Downing Street parties against Covid rules during lockdown.

The Prime Minister himself was fined for attending a meeting on his birthday, Mr Sunak was also fined.

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He was accused of misleading Parliament by saying that he was not aware of any rule violations in Parliament.

Mr Johnson survived a no-confidence vote in early June by a margin of 211 to 148, a far narrower margin than he had hoped.

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The Tories then lost two more by-elections in Tiverton and Honiton and Wakefield to the Lib-Dems and Labour, respectively.

How long has Boris Johnson been Prime Minister?

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Mr Johnson became Prime Minister on July 23, 2019, succeeding Theresa May – meaning he has held the role for just under three years.

As of July 7, he had served 1,079 days, but Ms May served 1,106 days between 2016 and 2019.

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He wants to remain interim prime minister until October while the election campaign for his successor takes place.

If the prime minister can remain in office until August 4 despite an announced intention to step down, he will have overtaken his immediate predecessor.

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Thursday (July 7) marks the point at which he surpasses the 1,078 days that Neville Chamberlain, who was Conservative Prime Minister between 1937 and 1940, had on the clock.

Boris Johnson has now overtaken six Prime Ministers with the shortest tenures since 1900: Andrew Bonar Law (211 days 1922-23), Alec Douglas-Home (364 days 1963-64), Anthony Eden (644 days 1955-57), Henry Campbell- Bannerman (852 days 1905-08), Gordon Brown (1,049 days 2007-10) and Neville Chamberlain (1,078 days 1937-40).

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If he makes it to the end of August he will have passed two more: Theresa May on August 4 and Jim Callaghan, Labor Prime Minister 1976-1979, on August 22.

Will Boris Johnson make a statement to the nation?

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Mr Johnson is set to issue a statement to the nation announcing he will step down as Prime Minister in the coming hours.

An exact time has yet to be determined.

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