Why are human remains being found in Lake Mead?

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Lake Mead’s water level has dropped rapidly over the past two decades, with the lake rapidly approaching Deadpool levels

Authorities confirmed the discovery was made on Saturday, August 6, at the lake’s swimming beach.

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Questions have been raised about the lake’s connection to the organized crime days of Las Vegas, with the mysterious discoveries leading to many theories.

Here’s everything you need to know about the human remains found at Lake Mead.

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Four human remains have been discovered on drought-stricken Lake Mead (Image: Getty Images)

Why do human remains keep turning up at Lake Mead?

Human remains surface at Lake Mead as the water level drops rapidly due to a drought.

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Corresponding NASAthe lake, the largest reservoir in the United States, currently only has a capacity of 27%.

The last time the water level was this low was in 1937 when the lake was first filled.

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An estimated 300 people have drowned in Lake Mead since its inception, with not all remains having been recovered.

As the water level has dropped, the lake has other surprises, including a sunken WWII landing craft.

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How many bodies were found at Lake Mead?

Four human remains have been found at Lake Mead, the last discovery being on August 7th.

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Each set of remains was discovered by members of the public who had walked the drought-stricken lake bed.

Here is a timeline of the human remains found at Lake Mead:

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The first human remains were found by boaters in Hemenway Harbour.

The body, discovered in a barrel, had been exposed by the falling water levels.

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According to local police, the person had died as a result of a gunshot wound and was wearing clothing resembling styles from the 1970s and 1980s.

There has been much speculation about the murder, with theories centered around the nearby city of Las Vegas, which was known for its links to organized crime.

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The case is similar to the murder of John Roselli, a crime boss with Las Vegas connections, whose body was found floating in a barrel in a bay outside of Miami.

The human remains have yet to be identified and Homicide is currently investigating the case.

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The second set of human remains was found in Callville Bay by two sisters paddling.

In conversation with the New York Times Of their discovery, the sisters said, “It wasn’t until I saw the jawbone with a silver filling that I thought, ‘Whoa, that’s a human,’ and I started freaking out.”

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Authorities believe the remains belonged to a person between the ages of 23 and 37.

The cause of death is still unknown and the human remains have yet to be identified.

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The third set of remains was discovered at Swim Beach.

The identity and cause of death are currently unknown and authorities have not released information about who found the remains.

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The fourth set of remains found was again at Swim Beach.

A statement from the National Park Service said: “Park rangers responded and, with the assistance of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police dive team, set up a perimeter to recover the remains. The investigations are ongoing.”

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The identity and cause of death are currently unknown.

A formerly sunken boat rests on a now dry stretch of lake bed at Lake Mead (Image: Getty Images)

Why is the water level in Lake Mead so low?

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Lake Mead is an artificial reservoir created by the Hoover Dam on the Colorado River.

Almost 25 million people in Arizona, Nevada and California depend on it for their water supply.

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Water levels have declined rapidly over the past two decades due to a drought sweeping across the western United States.

The lake, which is only 27% full, quickly reaches Deadpool level when the water in a reservoir drops so far that it cannot flow downstream.

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Speak with news week Steph McAfee, associate professor and Nevada State climatologist at the University of Nevada, Reno, explained the situation.

McAfee said: “There is good evidence that climate change plays a role here. A number of scientific papers have found that rising temperatures reduce the amount of water flowing down the Colorado River and into Lake Mead.”

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