Who could be the next prime minister after Boris Johnson?

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Boris Johnson will step down as Tory leader today and step down as UK Prime Minister in the autumn

Boris Johnson’s time as Tory leader and British Prime Minister is coming to an end.

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Mr Johnson is expected to step down as leader of the Conservative Party today (July 7) and will step down as Prime Minister in the autumn.

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A Tory leadership race will begin in earnest in the summer months, with the winner succeeding Mr Johnson as Prime Minister.

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The resignations came after Mr Johnson was forced to apologize for his handling of the Chris Pincher row.

Mr Pincher resigned as deputy chief whip after he claimed he groped two men, but Mr Johnson was informed of allegations against him back in 2019.

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The Prime Minister conceded that he should have sacked Mr Pincher when told of the allegations against him.

With Mr Johnson’s future as Prime Minister now in doubt, we’ve taken a look at the top five Tories proposed to succeed him.

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Who could be the next prime minister?

If Boris Johnson resigns then there will be no shortage of people in the running for the top job (Mazic News / Mark Hall)

If Boris Johnson steps down there will be no shortage of people in the running for the top job, including Rishi Sunak and Liz Truss.

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Another favorite to replace Mr Johnson would be Liz Truss, the Secretary of State.

Ms Truss has held various positions under three Tory prime ministers – David Cameron, Theresa May and Mr Johnson – and is the UK’s chief negotiator with the European Union.

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Among the other names touted as possible successors were Penny Mordaunt, Michael Gove, Jeremy Hunt and Dominic Raab.

Can Rishi Sunak become prime minister?

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Mr Sunak, who has resigned as Chancellor of the Exchequer, has won many admirers within the Conservative Party with his handling of pandemic spending.

In his resignation letter, Mr Sunak said it was not a decision he took lightly given the economic fallout from the pandemic and war in Ukraine. He wrote:

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“However, the public rightly expects proper, competent and reputable governance. I realize this may be my last ministerial post, but I believe these standards are worth fighting for and I am therefore resigning.

“I stayed true to you [Mr Johnson]. I supported you to become leaders of our party and encouraged others to do so. I have served as your Chancellor with gratitude for entrusting me with responsibility for the nation’s economy and finances. Most importantly, I have respected the powerful mandate you were given by the British people in 2019 and how, under your leadership, we broke the Brexit impasse.

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“That’s why I’ve always tried to compromise in order to deliver the things you want to achieve. On the occasions when I disagreed with you privately, I have supported you publicly. That is the nature of the collective government that underpins our system and it is particularly important that the Prime Minister and Chancellor remain united in difficult times like the one we are living through today.”

And added that it comes at a time when the UK is facing “immense challenges”.

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“We both want a low-tax, high-growth economy with world-class public services, but this can only be delivered responsibly if we are willing to work hard, make sacrifices and make tough choices,” he continued.

“I firmly believe that the public is ready to hear this truth. Our people know that if something is too good to be true, it isn’t true. They need to know that while there is a path to a better future, it is not easy. In preparation for our planned joint speech on the economy next week, it has become clear to me that our approaches are fundamentally too different.

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“I’m sad to be leaving government, but I’ve reluctantly come to the conclusion that we can’t go on like this.”

But an increase in Social Security payments, cuts in Universal Credit and the current cost-of-living crisis caused by soaring energy bills have left Mr Sunak vulnerable to criticism.

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When is the next federal election?

The Early Odds of Who Could Be the Next Conservative Leader (Mazic News/James Trembath)

The names in the frame set to replace Boris Johnson as leader of the Conservative party must take over before the next general election to become prime minister in this term.

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After a series of general elections that resulted in Mr Johnson’s victory in the winter of 2019, UK voters will next be asked to go to the voting booth in May 2024.

This is agreed in the Fixed Term Parliament Act, although there is the possibility of early elections being called if the incumbent government so decides.

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If Mr Johnson stays in power before the next general election, there is a chance he and the Conservative Party could lose to one or more competing parties.

Labor is traditionally known as the Tory’s biggest rival, with Sir Keir Starmer currently leading the party, who is also being questioned by police over a possible breach of lockdown rules.

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Sir Keir has announced he will resign if he is found to have broken the law.

The next odds for the British Prime Minister

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Deputy Prime Minister Dominic Raab is currently the favorite to succeed Boris Johnson – with a quota of 4/1.

Here are the latest odds from Bet365:

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  • Dominik Raab 4/1
  • Rishi Sunak 7/2
  • Penny Mordaunt 2.11
  • Sajid javid 8/1
  • Ben Wallace 8/1
  • Liz Fachwerk 10/1
  • Jeremy Hunt 1.10