When is the next solar storm?

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If strong enough, solar storms can disrupt satellites, cripple power grids, and disrupt radio and GPS signals



<p>Images from NASA/Solar Dynamics Observatory show a large solar flare erupting from the sun in June 2011 (Image: Getty Images)</p><div data-ad-id=
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Images from NASA/Solar Dynamics Observatory show a large solar flare erupting from the Sun in June 2011 (Image: Getty Images)

The space weather physicist Dr. Tamitha Skov shared the news on Twitter, tweeting: “Bullshot! A serpentine thread of a solar storm will hit the earth.”

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The scientist went on to predict signal interference for radio and GPS users.

Solar storms are caused when the sun releases charged particles from the sun, which interact with the earth’s atmosphere and cause a reaction.

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If powerful enough, they can jam satellites, cripple power grids, and disrupt GPS and other communications networks.

Corresponding SpaceWeather.comthe storm that was supposed to hit Earth was classified as Class Minor G1, which is the lowest threat level available.

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Here’s everything you need to know about when the next solar storm is coming and what it means for Earth.

When is the next solar storm?

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space weather have predicted that the next solar storm will hit Earth’s atmosphere on July 19, with further flares expected on July 20 and 21.

Images from NASA/Solar Dynamics Observatory show a large solar flare erupting from the sun in June 2011 (Image: Getty Images)

According to their website, the storm is classified as a Minor G1 class, which is the lowest rank.

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A Minor G1 class will only have a minor impact that can affect weak power grids, satellite operations and migratory birds.

They are the most common type, believed to strike Earth about 900 times in every 11-year solar cycle.

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In her Twitter post, Skov shares Nasa’s forecast model, along with a summary of what to expect during the upcoming storm.

Skov’s tweet reads: “Bullshot! A serpentine filament launched as a great solar storm in the Earthstrike Zone. NASA predicts the impact for early July 19. Strong aurora shows are possible with this one, deep in the mid-latitudes. Ham radio and GPS users expect signal interference on the night side of the earth.”

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What is a solar storm?

A solar storm occurs when the sun releases massive amounts of energy that form as solar flares and coronal mass ejections.

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They send a stream of electromagnetic waves down to Earth at a speed of three million miles per hour.

When a solar storm hits Earth’s atmosphere, it can create blinding displays like the Northern Lights, but it also has the ability to disrupt satellites, the power grid, and GPS communications.

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In this handout photo provided by NASA, a solar image shows a solar flare on the Sun (Image: Getty Images)

Are solar storms dangerous?

Solar storms are harmless to people on Earth because we are protected by the Earth’s atmosphere.

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However, if electronics or communications are compromised, it could result in widespread interference around the world.

Can solar storms affect electronics?

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Solar storms can affect electronics and have historically been known to cause power outages.

On March 13, 1989, Canada’s Quebec region experienced a power outage after a solar storm knocked out the power grid.

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The storm was considered the strongest geomagnetic storm since 1930 and caused the largest power outage to date.

The solar storm predicted by the Nasa model will not hit us as hard.

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It has the potential to affect satellites orbiting our planet and anyone using GPS signals.

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