When is next UK heatwave 2022? Met Office weather forecast

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Experts say summer heatwave temperatures of over 40C could become the norm for the UK due to climate change

Can we expect more heat waves this summer? (Image: Getty Images)

So if we recover from this extreme weather, the UK faces another heatwave this summer – and what does the latest Met Office forecast say?

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Here’s everything you need to know.

What is the UK weather forecast?

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The UK has mostly cooled since record high temperatures on July 18th and 19th.

Highs were recorded in most areas in the low to mid 20’s, although temperatures rose on Tuesday (2 August).

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Monks Wood in Cambridgeshire recorded a peak of 29.5℃ during the hot weather while the rest of the country sweltered in muggy conditions.

Wildfires destroyed homes in London during the heatwave (Image: Getty Images)

Temperatures were above 20 degrees across much of the South East on Wednesday (3 August), with mercury hitting at least 20 degrees in most other parts of England, Scotland and Wales.

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Dover, Kent recorded a high of 28℃ at 4pm.

Conditions are expected to be cooler on Thursday, Friday and Saturday (4th, 5th and 6th August) and in the low 20s across much of England and in the mid-teens elsewhere.

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Thursday is forecast to be cloudy for most of the day in many areas, with short, heavy showers expected in Scotland.

Sunday and Monday (7th and 8th August) are forecast to be warmer in the South East with highs in the mid 20’s expected over both days in London and the central south areas.

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Much of the rest of the UK is expected to experience temperatures in the late teens or early 20s.

Will there be another heat wave?

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For now, the Met Office says it sees nothing in its data to suggest another heatwave, matching July, is on the way.

The forecaster told Mazic News that the past few days’ heat has not been unusual for the time of year.

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A ‘heat dome’ over southwest Europe has sparked major wildfires (Image: AFP/Getty Images)

Instead of the heat being the main problem, the challenge facing Britain next month appears to be a lack of rain.

The Met Office said Britain had experienced its driest July since 1935, with the south-east, central-southern areas of England and East Anglia experiencing their driest July on record since records began in 1836.

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South East Water, which has announced a hose pipe ban for households across Kent and Sussex will come into effect, said the south east had received just 8% of its average rainfall over the past month.

Temperatures of 40℃ observed this week currently occur every 100 to 300 years, but could occur as frequently as every 15 years by 2100.

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A major heat wave ensues that continues to scorch many parts of southern Europe.

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