Shinzo Abe shot: former Japanese prime minister shot during speech

Advertisement

Japan’s current Prime Minister Fumio Kishida said Mr Abe was in a “serious condition”.

Japan’s former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has been shot dead during a campaign speech.

Advertisement

The country’s national broadcaster, NHK, said the 67-year-old appeared to be in a state of cardiac arrest.

Register to our Mazic News Today Newsletter

What happened to Shinzo Abe?

Advertisement

Two shots were apparently heard, with Mr Abe reportedly shot from behind.

Footage broadcast on NHK showed the former prime minister collapsing in the street and security guards running towards him.

Advertisement

Witnesses said he was bleeding and clutching his chest. He was later taken to the hospital.

A general view shows workers at the scene after an attack on Japan’s former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Kintetsu Yamato-Saidaiji station square in Nara on July 8, 2022. (Photo by STR/JIJI PRESS/AFP via Getty Images)

Police arrested a male suspect at the scene on suspicion of attempted murder, NHK said.

Advertisement

The suspect reportedly told police that he was unhappy with Mr Abe and intended to kill him.

Japan’s current Prime Minister Fumio Kishida said Mr Abe was in a “serious condition” and had asked members of his cabinet to return to Tokyo.

Advertisement

Mr Abe was shot dead in the western city of Nara while delivering a campaign speech ahead of Sunday’s upper house elections.

Response to the shooting of Shinzo Abe

Advertisement

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese tweeted: “Shocking news from Japan that former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has been shot dead – our thoughts are with his family and the people of Japan at this time.”

US Ambassador Rahm Emanuel said, “The US government and the American people pray for the well-being of Abe-san, his family and the people of Japan.”

Advertisement

Shinzo Abe’s political background

Mr. Abe became Japan’s longest-serving prime minister after two terms.

Advertisement

He resigned from his position in 2020 for health reasons.

However, he remained a significant presence in Japanese politics, controlling one of the key factions in the ruling Liberal Democratic Party.

Advertisement