Seven times that Lionesses have reached a major competition semi-final

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Here is every time the English women have reached the semi-finals of a major tournament.

After an almost perfect start to the tournament, Sarina Wiegman’s team is one of the top favorites for the cup and at the same time holds the home advantage.

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The Lionesses have met many disappointments in their history but the team has really improved in recent years and fans will be thrilled at the prospect of the ladies winning their first major competition on home soil.

Ahead of today’s highly anticipated clash with Sweden, we take a look at every time the English women have reached the semi-finals in their history…

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1984 Women’s European Championship – Final

The first time England Women reached the semi-finals in a major competition was in 1984 when they went one step further and reached the final.

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Staged in Denmark, England, Italy and Sweden, the Lionesses met the former in a two-legged semi-final at Crewe and then Hjørring.

Goals from Linda Curl and Liz Deighan secured a 2-1 win in the first leg before a Debbie Bampton winner in the return saw them through to the final.

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The final once again consisted of two stages, with the first being held in Gothenburg and the second being held at Luton Town’s home stadium, Kenilworth Road.

Trailing 1-0 before their home game, another Curl girl clinched the final on penalties before losing after coming within reach of the Euro Cup.

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Despite reaching the final, the two stages brought in just over 8,000 fans.

1987 Women’s Championship – Semifinals

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Only three years later, the English women again reached the semi-finals of the European Championships – Norway was the host.

England were determined to get revenge on Sweden as they faced Sweden again to compete for a place in the final.

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Despite leading 2-1 at half-time thanks to goals from Jackie Sherrard and Kerry Davis, Sweden fought back and eventually celebrated a dramatic 3-2 victory in extra time.

With only 300 spectators at Melløs Stadion, the crowd was significantly smaller than for the two teams that met at the previous tournament.

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England then lost their match for third place and finished fourth in a disappointing end to the competition.

1995 Women’s European Championship – Semifinals

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After three tournaments in which they didn’t qualify, the English women were back during EURO 1995 – once again in four different countries, England, Germany, Norway and Sweden.

The Lionesses faced a tough two-legged semi-final against soon-to-be champions Germany but failed to win either game and were defeated 4-1 in their home game at Vicarage Road.

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Two months later, the Germans added salt to the wounds with a 2-1 win in Bochum.

After attracting just 800 fans, Watford’s second leg drew an impressive 7000-strong fanbase in Germany.

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2009 Women’s European Championship – Final

After falling out in 1995, England had another disappointing run through 2009, failing to progress beyond the group stage.

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England narrowly progressed through their group after finishing third on four points behind Sweden and Italy.

They then faced a tough test against hosts Finland, playing a dramatic 3-2 win that saw Eni Aluko (2) and Fara Williams confirm victory.

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Next up was the semifinals against the Netherlands, who hadn’t even qualified for the European Women’s Championship until 2009.

Although the Netherlands forced England into extra time, Jill Scott secured a place in the final for the Lionesses with a 116th-minute winner.

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The 2009 final was these players’ first chance at great success, but Germany dominated them in a thrilling 6-2 win in Helsinki to secure their fifth straight title.

World Cup 2015 – Semifinals

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The English women had almost no success at the World Cup until 2015, failing to qualify on three occasions and being eliminated in the quarter-finals on the other three occasions.

After defeating Norway in the round of 16, England faced a tough duel with Canada in the quarter-finals.

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Early goals from Jodie Taylor and Lucy Bronze were enough to earn victory over the Canadians and propel them to their first-ever Women’s World Cup semifinals.

Despite the growing positive mood surrounding this England team, their fairy tale soon ends in a nervous match against Japan.

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Two penalties left the two sides with just minutes from the final whistle, but England were heartbroken when Laura Bassett gifted Japan with an own goal to knock them out of the competition.

However, the Lionesses beat Germany for third place.

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Women’s Euro 2017 – Semifinals

England followed up an impressive World Cup tournament with another good run at the 2017 European Women’s Championship – last year under Mark Sampson.

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After breaking through into Group D, England were challenged with a quarter-final draw against France, won by Jodie Taylor on the hour mark – with the striker becoming the tournament’s top scorer.

However, the Lionesses once again failed to make it past the semi-finals when they met hosts Netherlands in Eschede.

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In front of a crowd of 27,093, Sampson’s side were defeated 3-0 by the Netherlands, who then defeated Denmark in the final.

World Cup 2019 – Semifinals

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Once again the English women had another good run at the last World Cup.

After winning all three group games, Phil Neville’s side advanced to the semi-finals with comfortable 3-0 wins over Cameroon and Norway before taking on the United States in Lyon.

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Top scorer Ellen White gave the Lionesses hope as they equalized within 20 minutes, but Alex Morgan’s goal broke heart after half an hour as she knocked out England again in the semi-finals.

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