JK Rowling: why real life Quidditch sport changed its name

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When it was first announced that the game would change its name, QuidditchUK said, “Distancing JK Rowling will solidify the sport and community as the inclusive space they already are.”

Organizations like US Quidditch (USQ), Major League Quidditch (MLQ), Quidditch UK (QUK) and the International Quidditch Association (IQA) have all announced that they will change that name of the sport.

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Currently, Rowling has not responded to the decision to rebrand the sport.

That’s all you need to know.

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Why was Quidditch renamed Quadball?

Late last year, US Quidditch (USQ) and Major League Quidditch (MLQ) announced they were conducting a series of polls to find a new name for the sport after Rowling drew criticism for her views on gender identity.

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At the time, QuidditchUK (QUK) said the name change was a necessary “shift toward our own identity” due to issues surrounding the Warner Brothers film company’s brand and Rowling’s comments.

It said: “More importantly, distancing JK Rowling will solidify the sport and community as the inclusive space they already are.

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JK Rowling arrives at the World Premiere of Fantastic Beasts: The Mystery of Dumbledore at Royal Festival Hall on March 29, 2022 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images)

“Since our inception, inclusion of all people, regardless of race, sex, gender identity or background, has been a cornerstone of our sport.

“We cannot continue to call ourselves Quidditch and be associated with JK Rowling while she continues to make damaging and hateful comments against the many transgender athletes, staff and volunteers who call this sports community home.”

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It has since been announced that Quidditch will be known as quadball. Other names considered were Quickball, Quicker, Quidstrike, and Quadraball.

In a statement accompanying the announcement, QuidditchUK (QUK), which has yet to officially change its name on its website, said: “Following the announcement of USQ and MLQ in December last year, we are pleased to announce that we are joining USQ and other national governing bodies in renaming our sport Quadball.

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“QuidditchUK supports this great moment in the development of our sport, which is both symbolic and practical.

The Werewolves of London Quidditch team (in white and red) plays the Radcliffe Chimeras during the Crumpet Cup Quidditch tournament at Clapham Common on February 18, 2017 in London, England (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)

“The name change demonstrates a firm stance towards our trans players and members, gives us a stronger legal footing, and opens up greater opportunities for funding and outside partners.”

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In the announcement, QUK said it was “pleased with the name USQ chose, which was the second most popular name among our own members,” and that players should expect the balls and the snitch “at some point in the future.” to be renamed as well”, although no details were given.

“We intend to move forward with the QUK rebranding later this year and will be providing guidance to clubs alongside this,” the statement concluded.

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How is it played?

While the game got its start as a fictional sport at Rowling’s Harry Potter Since then, it has been transported into the real world with its own leagues and organizations.

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Of course, the game had to be adapted to be played as characters in the real world Harry Potter flew around on broomsticks.

QUK explains: “Quidditch is a fast-paced, mixed-gender, full-contact sport played in communities and universities by hundreds of players in the UK and around the world.

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The Keele Squirrels (in green) play the Radcliffe Chimeras during the Crumpet Cup Quidditch tournament at Clapham Common on February 18, 2017 in London, England (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)

“Seven players on each team compete to outperform their opponents by shooting the Quaffle through one of the opponent’s hoops, defending their own hoops with tackles and bludgers, and catching the snitch to win the game.”

Clubs compete in teams of 21 players, with rotating squads of seven players each on a pitch, with:

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  • Three chasers whose job is to defend the hoops and try to score against their opponents by shooting or hitting the quaffle (a volleyball) through one of the three hoops on the other team’s side – a goal is 10 points value
  • A goalkeeper who defends the hoops and works with the pursuers to score against their opponents
  • Two brawlers tasked with disrupting the opposing team by throwing bludgers (dodgeballs) at opposing players. There are always three bludgers in play and any player struck by a bludger thrown by the other team must drop the ball they are carrying, dismount their broom and run back to their own hoops to re-engage , before he can continue playing
  • A seeker who must catch the snitch and end the game – the snitch is worth 30 points and is associated with the snitch runner, who is an impartial official tasked with avoiding the seeker on both teams
The Snitch Runner poses in his uniform during the Crumpet Cup Quidditch tournament at Clapham Common on February 18, 2017 in London, England (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)

A broom is held between the legs of all players at all times, and any action by a player – including running, shooting, passing, catching, or tackling – must be completed with a broom between their legs.

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