How did Lamont Dozier die? Iconic Motown singer-songwriter, 81, was Hall of Fame inductee

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Phoenix, Arizona: Lamont Dozier, a renowned singer-songwriter best known for his work on classic songs like “Where Did Our Love Go” and “Two Hearts,” died August 8 at his home outside of Scottsdale, Arizona. He was 81 years old. His family shared the sad news of his death with them.

Lamont Dozier was a member of the acclaimed Holland-Dozier-Holland trio, which wrote and produced “You Can’t Hebrew Love” and “Heat Wave,” among others. It enabled Motown to become very successful in the 1960s. Dozier’s death was announced just months after acclaimed performer and comedian Louie Anderson died in January. Another legendary figure that Hollywood lost in the same month was Bob Saget. Other well-known people who died last year included Betty White, Chick Vennera, Jay Black and Jeanette Maus, leaving their loyal followers heartbroken.

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Lamont Dozier

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How did Lamont Dozier die?

Lamont Dozier was born in Detroit, Michigan in June 1941. 14 of the songs he co-wrote and produced reached #1 on the US Billboard chart, catapulting him to the top. He was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1988 and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990 as part of the Holland-Dozier-Holland combo, which also included Brian and Eddie Holland. Speaking of the death, his son Lamont Dozier Jr. announced it on Instagram by posting a photo of himself and his father and writing, “Rest in Heaven Dad!” add a sad face.

The family refused to disclose the reason for Lamont Dozier’s death. MEAWW will keep you informed. Lamont Dozier was an integral member of the Motown family and his numerous contributions as a singer, songwriter and producer left a beautiful and lasting impression on culture around the world, according to record label Motown, which paid a fitting tribute to the legendary singer -Songwriter on Instagram. The entire “Motown family” sends our sincere condolences to the Dozier family.

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“He had the soul of music in him”

Eddie Holland provided insight into Dozier’s personality, repeatedly collaborating with him to write hits for artists such as the Supremes, Four Tops, the Isley Brothers and others. Eddie reportedly said, “He had a lot of energy for work,” as quoted by website Freep. He never left his piano and continued to create.

Eddie said: “When he was playing the piano, he was at his liveliest. No matter how he felt — depressed, heartbroken, or happy — he sat at the piano. He also felt happier there. It had a very, very profound effect on his thinking. He possessed the spirit of music and music itself. The creator and owner of Invictus Records and Hot Wax Records was Lamont Dozier. He has created a string of hits for Freda Payne, 100 Proof Aged for Soul, CEOs and other artists.

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“A powerhouse in R&B. And a singer in his own right’

Many people paid tribute on social media. Lamont Dozier, please rest in peace. He produced some of the best tunes ever written. He was a national treasure whose contribution to Motown and soul/R&B should never be forgotten. One said: “How many songs do we love this man wrote,” and another added: “Oh wow. a major player in R&B. He is also his own singer. “Going Back to My Roots” was a chart topper in 1977. We felt it because it came out the same year as the Roots miniseries. Even now I still use it to reset myself. Quiet please.

The following message read: “RIP Lamont Dozier who has written many wonderful songs including Baby Don’t Do It with his partners Brian and Eddie Holland. It was covered by The Band and in my humble opinion this song best exemplifies that.” unparalleled brilliance of the rhythm section. Sad to hear from Lamont Dozier, another user tweeted. Big love to him for the colossal number of fantastic songs he has co-written, including this one, although it will not receive the same level of recognition as more prominent and well-known celebrities. “Lamont Dozier was part of a co-writing partnership that didn’t just write songs, they invented a genre,” one person wrote in their conclusion. I’ve never forgotten the best music I’ve ever heard.

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