Hacksaw Jim Duggan Explains How to win the Royal Rumble

Advertisement


Advertisement

In this interview, the first-ever Royal Rumble winner discusses how he created wrestling history and shares tips with this year’s competitors. 

Try to avoid people, Hacksaw Jim Duggan suggests.  The less time you spend with other people, the longer you’ll be in the ring, he says. 

Advertisement

hacksaw jim duggan

The WWE Hall of Famer is describing how to win the Royal Rumble, which is one of the year’s four most popular pay-per-view events.

Advertisement

“It’s all about longevity,” the former wrestler says in an interview with Betway online casino.

That’s why, when the Royal Rumble is on, everyone rushes to the corners. That’s a secure location. Hacksaw understands what he’s talking about, having won the first Royal Rumble in 1988.

Advertisement

He was number 13 out of 20 competitors that year, and the Royal Rumble was only expanded to 30 competitors the following year.

He fought his way to the last two, when he saw the 450lb, 6ft 9in One Man Gang crash through a break he had caused in the ropes, leaving him as the last man remaining.

Advertisement

“You want to be aggressive, strong, and quick, and luck of the draw plays a big part in that,” he explains.

“It’s always preferable to arrive later. You’re younger than the people who’ve been there for a while. That’s a long time in the ring for the first five guys.

Advertisement

“You may be kicking butt and then someone walks up behind you and that’s the end of it.”

“It’s nothing like a singles match.” I appreciated being able to regulate the speed in a fight but forget about that in a battle royale or a Royal Rumble.

Advertisement

“There’s no one in charge of anything; it’s like the Wild West out there.”

Nothing beats the Rumble for drama, unpredictability, and complete anarchy when it comes to single pay-per-view events.

Advertisement

In a nutshell, it’s the biggest wrestling event of the year, and it’s a must-see.

Yet, in 1988, it was a new concept created by Pat Patterson, a former WWE wrestler, producer, and adviser.

Advertisement

“Back then, you had a special bunch of guys,” Duggan adds.

“I believe today’s talent is far superior in terms of athletic ability, but people my age were far more imaginative.”

Advertisement

Because we didn’t have a board of men come up with our persona – I own Hacksaw Jim Duggan and copyrighted it long before I joined WWE – we were far more prepared to do something different.

And it was Duggan’s willingness to be open-minded that led to what was unquestionably a career-defining chance.

Advertisement

“That’s the biggest one in my wrestling accomplishments,” he says.

“After I won the thing, no one in the entire building was more startled than myself.”

Advertisement

“I’ll go through the sequence of the men that went out and go down and down until I get to the winner: Hacksaw Jim Duggan,”

It was because of this level of commitment that he returned to the WWE in 2009 and again in 2012 when he faced some familiar foes.

Advertisement

Hacksaw Jim, now 68 and coping from cancer for the second time after surgery in October, has ruled out a comeback.

He offers some advice for this year’s entrants, although he won’t be in the ring 34 years after brawling his way into wrestling history.

Advertisement

“If people had gambled on the initial scrap, Hacksaw Jim’s chances of winning would have been very good.

It was because of this level of commitment that he returned to the WWE in 2009 and again in 2012 when he faced some familiar foes.

Advertisement

Advertisement