Flash floods UK: where is at risk this week of flooding?

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A meteorologist has warned that the rain will actually do little to help with the drought

That United Kingdom experienced something extreme weather in the last few weeks – and now afterwards days of intense heat People are warned to prepare for flash floods.

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Here’s everything you need to know.

After days of extreme heat, the UK is now braced for flash floods.

Where in the UK is there a risk of flooding?

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The whole of the UK is currently at risk of flash flooding, but some areas are more likely than others.

Flash floods are most common in areas with narrow and steep rivers as this provides the perfect platform for faster water flow.

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Wherever hard surfaces such as B. Built-up urban areas that do not allow water to drain into the ground are also more prone to flash flooding as local drainage systems can become overloaded due to surface overflow.

After a drought, the number of hard surface areas increases significantly because the soil is so dry, leading to an increased likelihood of flash floods.

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How much rain is expected in the UK this week?

About 50mm of rain fell in three hours in some places in the north.

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Some areas farther south may fall about 30mm of rain in a three-hour period.

The Met Office provides a daily precipitation forecast, updating every hour where rain can be expected today and tomorrow.

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There’s also a precipitation map that shows you where in the country it’s going to rain today.

The map can also be used to determine whether the rain today or tomorrow will be persistent or more sporadic.

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What is the Met Office weather forecast?

Today, Monday, August 15, there will be intermittent heavy rain in the north, sunny intervals and heavy thunderstorms in the south.

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It is expected to rain as far south as London and Cardiff and as far north as Edinburgh and Inverness, also hitting Belfast.

Experts also say that showers can temporarily turn into longer periods of heavy rain.

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The Met Office forecast states: “More choppy and cloudy, although also some sunshine, particularly in the south-eastern areas of the UK where it remains hot.

“Showers and thunderstorms continue to spread into the afternoon, although some fragments are escaping. Less hot for many, feels cool in wetter northern areas.

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“Thunderstorms will begin to ease in England and Wales tonight, although some will persist and may intensify later.

“Scotland sees more general rain, rain in Northern Ireland tends to be lighter. Still relatively warm.”

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The weather forecast for the rest of the week ending Friday 19th August is similar.

Met Office experts are forecasting heavy showers and thunderstorms in the south and drier conditions farther north on Wednesday, August 17.

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Most places are expected to be dry on Thursday, August 18, but rain will move in from the northwest and lighten to the southeast on Friday, August 19 to become sunny.

What did the Met Office say?

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Dan Stroud, a weather forecaster at the Met Office, said the drastic change in weather from recent prolonged hot spells and dry days and nights is due to a change in barometric pressure.

He said: “We’ve had a few days now where we’ve had clear strong clear skies and strong sunshine which has been heating up the ground.

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“We used to have high pressure, now we have low pressure, so the air is becoming more unstable.

“Since we had very high ground temperatures at times, it doesn’t actually take that much for the air to become even more unstable and for thunderstorms to form quickly.”

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He also explained why the rain can lead to flash floods – and actually does little to combat the drought.

“It will help a little but to be honest it’s almost the wrong kind of rain.

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“What we’re likely to see is some heavy, intense downpours. Because the soil is baked so dry, it’s very difficult for the soil to really absorb the water very quickly.

“What happens in those circumstances is the water drains off and we might have surface runoff issues, so some flash flooding.”

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What Causes Flash Floods?

Flash flooding occurs when the rail falls so fast that the ground below cannot absorb enough of it.

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Thunderstorms are probably the most common cause of flash floods due to the severity and frequency of rainfall, which doesn’t give the ground a chance to soak up the water and drain it away quickly enough.

This causes roads to become like rivers, and there is often very little time between the rainfall and the flash flood.

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Due to the warm weather that has spread across the country in recent days, every area is at risk of thunderstorms – and therefore flash floods.

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