Eurovision: how many times has UK won the song contest?

Advertisement

Bucks Fizz won the Eurovision Song Contest in 1981 with their hit “Making Your Mind Up”.

Bucks Fizz won the 1981 Eurovision Song Contest (Image: Getty Images)

Advertisement

This year, British act Sam Ryder, a TikTok star and singer-songwriter, was well received.

Register to our Mazic News Today Newsletter

There is hope that he will do better than last year’s zero-point rookie James Newman.

Advertisement

The UK has had a tough ride in the Eurovision Song Contest over the past decade, finishing last five times.

But it wasn’t always like this, from Bucks Fizz to Lulu, here’s everything you need to know about when Britain last won Eurovision.

Advertisement

When is Eurovision 2022?

Sam Ryder hopes to win Eurovision 2022 for the UK (Image: Getty Images)

You can watch Eurovision on BBC One from 8pm, with the event again narrated by Graham Norton.

Advertisement

How many times has Britain won Eurovision?

Great Britain has won the Eurovision Song Contest five times.

Advertisement

The first win was in 1967 with Sandie Shaw’s hit Puppet on a String and the last 30 years later in 1997.

The most memorable win was Bucks Fizz, who wowed audiences with their hit “Making Your Mind Up,” which featured a daring, rock-ripping dance routine with big hair and ’80s-style attire.

Advertisement

When did Britain last win Eurovision?

Great Britain most recently won the Eurovision Song Contest in 1997 with “Katrina and the Waves”.

Advertisement

Here are the UK acts that have won Eurovision:

Sandie Shaw – Marionette on a String, 1967

Advertisement
Sandy Shaw was Britain’s first Eurovision winner in 1967 (Image: Getty Images)

Shaw was the first act ever to win the Eurovision Song Contest for Britain, bringing the Eurovision Song Contest to London for the first time in 1968.

Lula – Bomb Bang a Bang, 1969

Advertisement
Lulu won the Eurovision Song Contest in 1969 (Image: Getty Images)

The UK didn’t have to wait much longer for their second win, with Lulu accepting the award in 1969.

Brotherhood of Man – Save Your Kisses for Me, 1976

Advertisement
Brotherhood of Man won with the song “Save All Your Kisses For Me”. (Image: Getty Images)

Brotherhood of Man finished 17 points ahead of France in 1976, winning the top spot.

Bucks Fizz – Make a decision, 1981

Advertisement
Bucks Fizz are one of the most memorable winners of the Eurovision Song Contest (Image: Getty Images)

Perhaps one of the most memorable wins, Making Your Mind Up, saw Bucks Fizz’s rock rip routine help them take home the prize.

Her appearance was quintessential ’80s, complete with big hair.

Advertisement

Katrina and the Waves – Love Shine a Light, 1997

The last time Britain won the Eurovision Song Contest was in 1997 with Katrina and the Waves.

Advertisement

Who were the biggest flops in Britain?

James Newman didn’t earn a point at Eurovision 2021 (Image: Getty Images)

The UK used to be a top contender for the Eurovision Song Contest, but now it’s no stranger to scoring zero, having scored zero twice.

Advertisement

The first time it failed to score was in 2003, and it has struggled to score high in the competition ever since.

These are the Eurovision UK acts with the lowest scores:

Advertisement

Jemini was Britain’s first Zero Point act. The pair blamed a technical problem for being upset, but the incident has gone down in Eurovision history as one of Britain’s worst performances.

Andy Abraham – Even If, 2008

Advertisement

The X Factor runner-up scored just 14 points and finished last in the competition with his song “Even If.”

Josh Dubovie – That sounds good to me, 2010

Advertisement

The 19-year-old singer finished last in the competition with a low score of just 10 points.

Michael Rice – Bigger Than Us, 2019

Advertisement

The UK finished last in Tel Aviv with Rice’s song Bigger Than Us. Luckily they got 11 points so they didn’t score zero.

James Newman – Embers, 2021

Advertisement

In 2021, the UK achieved its second score from zero.

Newman received no points from either the audience or the jury vote.

Advertisement