Did 3000 Cows Die In Kansas On Account Of Excessive Heat?

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Reuters says many cattle in Kansas died over the weekend because of the high heat and humidity.

Multiple online reviews state that 3,000 cattle have died from heat stress. But based on what farmers and livestock experts have said, the damage has been said to be greater.

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According to DTN, the rising temperature in Kansas has been a cause for concern, and the final death toll has not yet come in.

3000 cows die in Kansas

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3000 cows die in Kansas

More than 3000 cows dead in Kansas?

A heartbreaking video of dead cows that has gone viral on Twitter claims 3,000 cattle have died in Kansas because of the heat.

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We won’t embed the video here because it contains disturbing imagery, but Kansas state officials said Tuesday that “at least 2,000” cows have died.

But various reviews have shown that around 10,000 cows have died due to the heat and humidity.

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DTN said Tuesday that according to information from livestock experts, the “recent heatwave sweeping through Kansas feedlots has killed an estimated 10,000 fat cattle” (June 14).

Over the weekend, the temperature is said to have been above 100 degrees Fahrenheit in most areas.

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At the time of writing, it was not clear how the dead cattle were selected.

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What does the cattle head suggest?

Although the exact number of dead cows in Kansas has not been released, reviews with varying numbers have been circulating around the internet. Some people even use the phrase “cattle’s head,” so it’s important to know what it means.

The time span is used to indicate a specific group of cattle.

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“A cattle head is a way of talking about a group of cattle based on how many individual cattle are in the group, which is typically a ranch or farm,” says Fauna Facts. For example, if a farmer says he has 140 cows in his herd, that means he has 140 cows in his herd.

Experts make the impression of heat clear?

Livestock experts have explained how stress leads to losses on fattening farms.

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AJ Tarpoff, who works for the Kansas State University Extension, says when there’s a “perfect storm” with too much heat and there’s no way to cool off at night, cattle can overheat and die from stress.

And Drew Lerner, the president of World Weather Inc., told Reuters: “It’s going to be so hot that the animals will be stressed. They can’t say, “I checked them three days ago.” When it’s hot, you have to go outside every day to make sure they have enough water.

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The post Did 3,000 cows die from excessive heat in Kansas? appeared first on theancestory.com.

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