Commonwealth Games, Birmingham 2022 | Mazic News

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Hudson-Smith, 27, won a 400m bronze medal at the World Championships in Eugene, Oregon after enduring a three-year mental health battle in which he attempted suicide



<p>Matthew Hudson-Smith aims for gold at the Commonwealth Games.  (Getty Images)</p><div data-ad-id=
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Matthew Hudson-Smith is aiming for gold at the Commonwealth Games. (Getty Images)

Olympic legend Christine Ohuruogu has revealed her immense “pride” after her mentee Matthew Hudson-Smith overcame a suicide attempt to claim a World Championships medal last month.

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In July, Hudson-Smith won a 400-meter bronze medal at the World Championships in Eugene, Oregon, after enduring a three-year mental struggle in which he attempted suicide.

The 27-year-old made it onto the podium with a time of 44.66 seconds, finishing behind US winner Michael Norman and Silver medalist Kirani James of Grenada.

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Hudson-Smith has since cited teammates Dina Asher-Smith and Nethaneel Mitchell-Blake as sources of support and named track and field legend Ohuruogu for her mentorship.

The collaboration between Hudson-Smith and Ohuruogu has produced a first global individual medal for the Black Country star, who is now among the favorites to compete for gold at the Commonwealth Games.

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Ohuruogu said: “[My emotions] are a bit mixed. I think first of all I’m proud of him – for being able to push through what he went through and turn that into something so overwhelmingly good.

“I think that’s primarily the reason for my pride – I just knew it meant so much to him.”

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In 2018, Hudson-Smith won the European 400m title and a silver medal in the 400m relay.

But over the following three years, the athlete’s hopes at the track were dashed by a series of Achilles tendon, hamstring and hip injuries, culminating in a suicide attempt in 2021.

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Ohuruogu continued, “You only see a small part of the journey. It is very difficult to articulate what this success means to someone who has not walked this path.

“I know where he’s from, I understand why he was crying [upon winning World Championship bronze] – I get it. The emotional dam was broken when he got this medal.

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“It’s something we’ve talked about for a while, he knows he’s in good shape and I think it’s a real testament to him and his character.

“I was relieved too – I’m not going to lie – I was like ‘phew’! He told me he could do it, and he did.”

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For Wolverhampton-born Hudson-Smith, attention now turns to the Commonwealth Games, where he aims to wow crowds at his home circuit.

In 2018 he had a false start on his run but this time he will be the one to beat after showing Eugene of the Commonwealth’s best athletes at the games.

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World silver medalist and former Olympic gold medalist Kirani James will not compete in Birmingham while Olympic gold medalist Steven Gardiner missed Eugene through injury.

Ohuruogu has stressed that Hudson-Smith must remain focused after the World Cup given the exhausted 400m field in the Commonwealths.

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The former Olympic, World and Commonwealth champion said: “I see him now and I say I’m super proud of you, but at the same time I’m like ‘the work is not done yet’.

“I gotta say, ‘You gotta keep going, Mathew — we can’t stop and party too much.’

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“As much as he wishes that with his family and his coach, we still have a lot to do.

“I said to Mathew, ‘I’m going to lock you up again now and get back to work. Let’s put down the metaphorical champagne glasses and get on with it.’

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“I’m very proud. I think he’s done amazingly well and is going into these Commonwealth games in such good spirits.”

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