Adidas sports bra advert banned in UK

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The Twitter and billboard ad campaign featured bare breasts and sparked complaints for objectifying women

A campaign by Adidas that featured dozens of breasts and was intended to promote the diversity of its sports bra range has been banned by the UK.

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A Adidas Campaign that featured dozens of breasts and was intended to promote the diversity of their range sports bras was banned by the United Kingdom.

The Advertising Standards Agency (ASA) criticized the ads for using explicit nudity and also placing the ads where children can see them.

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So what did the ad show, what exactly did the ASA say and how did Adidas react?

Here’s what you need to know.

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What did the ad show?

The advert, which ran on Twitter and some major billboards across the UK, featured various bare breasts.

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The picture that was first posted on the Adidas UK Twitter showed the breasts of 20 women of different skin color, shape and size in a grid format in February.

The image was captioned, “We believe women’s breasts of all shapes and sizes deserve support and comfort. That’s why our new sports bra range includes 43 styles, so everyone can find the right fit for them.”

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Other posters featured similarly cropped images of 62- and 64-year-old women and carried the tagline “The reasons we didn’t just make a new sports bra.”

What exactly did the ASA say?

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The campaign resulted in 24 complaints to the ASA, as people believed the ads were baseless and objectified women by “sexualizing them and reducing them to body parts”.

They also said the images were harmful and offensive and feared they could also be seen by children.

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The ASA said the campaign’s depiction of bare breasts, including an ad that used pixelation to blur models’ nipples, “is likely to be viewed as explicit nudity.”

They said: “We noticed that the breasts were the focus of the ads and there was less emphasis on the bras themselves, which were only referred to in the accompanying text.

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“Because the ads contained explicit nudity, we felt they required careful targeting to avoid offending viewers.”

The ASA said the large pages of billboards were not targeted and could be seen by people of all ages, including children, and the ads were therefore likely to provoke widespread offense.

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According to the ASA, the use of the ad on the Adidas Twitter page does not correspond to the usual content of the brand and therefore also rated it as offensive.

Twitter said the bare nipples ad was an “organic, not a paid tweet” that had been reported by some users but was not found to violate their terms of service.

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The ASA concluded that “the ads must not be re-appeared in the offending forms”.

They said: “We have instructed Adidas UK to ensure their ads are non-offensive and are targeted responsibly.”

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What did Adidas say?

Adidas UK defended its ad campaign, saying the images were not gratuitous or sexual, but instead were meant to “reflect and celebrate different shapes and sizes and illustrate diversity”.

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The sportswear company also said the images had been cropped to protect the models’ identities and that those models had all volunteered to take part in the campaign and supported its goals.

The firm also said: “It is important to note that the ASA ruling is related to the untargeted use of this creative in email/banner ads etc, rather than the creative itself and the message that we are proud of.” stand and it will be displayed on adidas.com.”

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Adidas added that it has not placed the ads on billboards or billboards near schools or places of worship and does not believe the campaign will cause harm or harm to children.

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