Adidas open up discussion on diversity of female bodies

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Was the banned Adidas ad a tactical PR stunt or a groundbreaking femininity campaign?

Sportswear brand Adidas recently saw an ad banned by the Advertising Standards Authority earlier this week for objectifying women.

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Adidas’ campaign featured multiple pairs of female breasts to promote diversity in their new sports bra range, but after receiving 24 complaints, the ASA said the ads were gratuitous and “sexualized (women) by reducing them to bodies would parts” and on the grounds that they could be seen by children.

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The sportswear company defended its images, which were running on Twitter and major billboard sites, saying the ads were “intended to reflect and celebrate different shapes and sizes and exemplify diversity.”

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Adidas did not place the ads on billboards or billboards near schools or places of worship to avoid harm or harm to children, but the ASA nonetheless stated, “We found that the breasts were the focus of the ads and less emphasis on it bras were laid themselves.”

The German multinational is teetering on the edge of ASA guidelines on nudity.

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Their guidelines state: “Ads that feature a level of nudity that is neither explicit nor sexualized are less likely to be seen as problematic, even in non-targeted media.”

While the ASA clearly felt the ad was overly sexualized, we wonder why?

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As seems representative of all topics related to women’s bodies, the two predictable sides have formed and voiced their views on whether Adidas objectifies women’s bodies or whether they actually celebrate the differences and imperfections of body types.

However, the other question that has arisen as a result of the Adidas campaign is whether they merely decided to jump on the female empowerment bandwagon for their own PR win.

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nationalworld spoke to Fara Darvill, out design of structurewho pointed out, “This type of PR stunt is a cynical and divisive tactic — while it encourages discussion about the brand, it also risks angering some customers.

“In this case they took a calculated risk in terms of the kind of women it might offend and with only 24 complaints to the ASA it has paid off for the brand’s PR – we talk about it every three months later in the campaign.” went live.”

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If Adidas really did create an ad campaign that represents a venture, perhaps slightly misguided, into honoring femininity of all shapes and sizes while promoting their own brand, is that really such a bad thing?

As Ms. Darvill also explains, “Ultimately, sales will show how this pays off in the long run.”

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We may all be talking about her new sports bras, but more importantly, we also recognize the beauty in the variations of the female body.

We also spoke to Truant London’s Toni Gaventa and claimed: “We need more imperfect nudity in our lives. If only more brands would take a stand together to shine a spotlight on real women and our very different, but equally amazing, imperfect bodies.

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“Because guess what, there is no such thing as perfection. We should not only celebrate and reward these more realistic campaigns, but go further to support better representation of women.”

While Adidas is worth about 30 billion euros and therefore doesn’t need any additional PR to elevate itself, their ad has sparked an important discussion on the topic of female ideals of beauty and their sexualization.

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The company is using the images of boobs to promote its new sports bras – which doesn’t sound entirely unreasonable – given the fundamental function of a sports bra.

Additionally, they explore the need to appreciate each person’s different body type – something that has been seriously lacking in the fashion industry in recent years.

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A woman’s body should be slim but not too skinny, and curvy but not fat – how can nearly four billion people conform to the same standard?

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